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New Jersey’s .13 billion Mega Millions jackpot remains unclaimed months after drawing
New Jersey’s .13 billion Mega Millions jackpot remains unclaimed months after drawing

Check your pockets!

The winner who bought a $1.13 billion Mega Millions ticket at a New Jersey liquor store in March has still not claimed the largest prize in the state’s history, according to the lottery authority.

The life-changing jackpot is the fifth-largest in Mega Millions history. The ticket, which has a cash value of $537.5 million, was purchased at a ShopRite liquor store on Route 66 in Monmouth County.

But in the months that followed, no winner emerged.

“The $1.13 billion Mega Millions jackpot won on Tuesday, March 26 on a single ticket in Neptune, New Jersey has not been claimed at this time,” the New Jersey Lottery said in a statement on Tuesday.


Richard Saker, owner of Saker ShopRite, receives a check from James Carey. New Jersey Lottery Executive Director James Carey
Richard Saker, owner of Saker ShopRite, receives a check from New Jersey Lottery CEO James Carey in March. Doug Hood / USA TODAY NETWORK

Billboard
The $1.13 billion prize has yet to be claimed. Getty Images

The winning numbers were 7, 11, 22, 29, 38 and the golden mega ball was 4.

After 31 consecutive drawings without a winner, the jackpot had grown to over a billion dollars.

The liquor store ShopRite received a prize of $30,000 for selling the ticket.

Instead of a one-time cash payment of $537.5 million, the winner also has the option of receiving the entire prize in installments over 30 years.

The New Jersey Lottery recommended that the unknown winner “sign the ticket, make copies of it, contact professional and financial advisors” and call them to file a claim.

Winners in the Garden States are legally allowed to remain anonymous, but anyone who wins more than $600 must tell lottery officials their identity to claim their prize.

In addition, lottery officials share the winner’s identity with government agencies to ensure claims are verified for “unpaid obligations” such as child support, loans and tax arrears.

By Seren